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Books, I read them ...

edited February 2011 in Caturday!
Ok, so the last time I read a real book was about 10 years ago, and it was because I had to because of school. Since then I read scientific stuff for most of the time.

However, after my trip to Perú, because of the lack of internet I went and dig my old books that I left about 8 years ago. You see, back then I was planing to read them but since I migrated I totally forgot about them.

So far I have read "The man who counted" and "The alchemist". Man, they are awesome books.

I want to know what kind of books do you all read, maybe I would check them out after I finish reading "The Alchemist" by Paulo Coehlo. <img class=" title="In Love" />
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Comments

  • I like David Drake.
  • I heard the Alchemist was rad. I may check it out. American Gods is on my bookshelf yet to be read, because I've still not finished Snow Crash. Also, Orson Scott Card's Empire is still waiting, as is 1984.

    If I'd stop reading Ender's Game and Armor over and over, I'd be good.
  • Haruki Murakami, JG Ballard, William Gibson and Kelly Link are all authors that consistently engage and entertain me.

    Yesterday I finished Don DeLillo's "White Noise." Very good, but maybe a little dated at this point and aimed so squarely at American middle-class existential angst that I'm not sure it holds much appeal outside that demographic. Not sure what I'll start today. Either more Murakami or a biography of painter John Singer Sargent.

    So have you found The Alchemist inspiring?
  • I'm currently reading the book of Jumper, by Steven Gould, which is a hell of a lot better than the film. Finally finished The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay recently, which I can't recommend enough.

    Oh, and no matter who you are, you have to read some Joe Lansdale - Bad Chilli is a good start.
  • "Tom" said:
    Finally finished The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay recently, which I can't recommend enough.
    I've been meaning to read this for a couple years now. Even picked it up this morning but didn't take it with me. Maybe I'll finally start it.
  • You should, it's good. Really, really good. It's pretty long, though - both in the length of the book, and the time span it...spans.
  • edited March 2008
    "shaloop" said:
    Yesterday I finished Don DeLillo's "White Noise."
    I read this in undergraduate English. As an engineer, I was amused by the constant interjections of TV quotes. See, I was thinking about the idea of "white noise", as in a steady random-noise static that just blankets everything with this constant SSSSHHHHHH. But it's difficult to get a truly random signal; most "random" signals are just conglomerations of individual signals all played at the same time, so occasionally you'll get a "spike" as several signals combine. (this is like the "rogue wave" you get at sea.) So that's why the book has those occasional lines from the TV; it's underscoring the idea that we think things are just random and completely incomprehensible, but in fact it's just that life is complicated and everything happens at once.

    ...I explained all that to my English teacher, and her eyes glazed over by about the second sentence. I got an A.

    PS "we're in a gleaming silver death machine! AAARRRRHHH!"

    "Kavalier and Clay": I kind of lost interest during the part in the Arctic, which beats out George R. R. Martin for "most instances of something horrible coming out of fucking nowhere and happening to a character you really like".
  • I am re-reading BLADE RUNNER 2: THE EDGE OF HUMAN.
  • I'm in the middle of Thanatos Syndrome. Its a fun little conspiracy book by Walker Percy. I was reading The Best American Non Required Reading, too, but all the short stories seemed to be about how screwed up people were. That got sorta boring.

    I wish I was reading Snow Crash and I just might be now.
  • I am reading RCN LT. Leary Commanding. Before that It was Hyperion and also when I find the time The compelte Illustrated Guide to Joinery.
  • Feddy: Did you read "Fall Of Hyperion"? "Hyperion" and "Fall..." are basically just Part One and Part Two of a big long book.

    "Endymion" and "Rise Of Endymion" are really not as good.
  • I bought Fall of Hyperion but I started this other book first and I kinda got the impression that is was a strict continuation since nothing really happens in Hyperion besdies a whole lot of setup.
  • "RobotBastard" said:

    "Kavalier and Clay": I kind of lost interest during the part in the Arctic, which beats out George R. R. Martin for "most instances of something horrible coming out of fucking nowhere and happening to a character you really like".
    I think one of the reasons I took so long to read that book is because of all the horrible things that happen. Things...sort of improve after the Arctic bit, though.
  • Yeah, the Arctic seriously depressed me. Still one of my favorite books ever though.

    If you like fantasy, read the Discworld books by Terry Pratchett. You'll laugh, you'll think, you'll say "Wait, was that a reference to ABBA?"

    Also Cory Doctorow's "Down And Out in the Magic Kingdom" was an awesome scifi book.

    I've been on a major Gaiman kick lately, so I've been reading Sandman, American Gods, Neverwhere, Anansi Boys, Good Omens, Fragile things, and I'm planning on getting Smoke And Mirrors and Coraline.

    I love Neil Gaiman.

    I should read more books, instead of just comics all the time. I just read 1984 again for my English class. If you thought the Arctic events in Kavalier and Clay were depressing, try reading the last 100 pages of 1984 all in one go.
  • I really like The Dresden Files series by Jim Butcher. The books aren't very thought provoking or deep, but the main character is just so awesome that it makes reading the books a lot of fun. The main character basically being the wizard equivalent of John McClane. The wizard is also a PRIVATE DETECTIVE.
  • Going After Cacciato, a vietnam book. The Rape of Nan King, a WW2 book. Hans Christian Anderson's Complete Fairy Tales, for fun.
  • I am reading:
    Hart and Weschler's The Federal Courts and the Federal System, Trade Regulation: Cases and Materials, Advanced Torts: Economic and Dignitary Torts, and Constitutional Law the Seventeenth edition! Let me tell you, that seventeenth edition is an emotional tour de force. Man i hate that phrase. Anyway, yeah i am so busy trying to stuff law reading into my brain i have no time to actually read. its lame.
    But I read the Dune series (only up to God Emperor) this summer. Pretty freaking rad.
    sigh, back to my law reading now. Oh Hart and Weschler, such rascals, what will you think of next! Essential functions theory against jurisdiction stripping?? Har har har!
  • Grumps, don't think you're better than us just because you are.

    Dune is totally rad.
  • Electronic Gaming Monthly.
  • I read a lot of nonfiction. I'm such a This American Life whore. . . Sarah Vowell and David Rakoff's books are some of my favorites. Currently picking through the Ira Glass edited The New Kings of Non-Fiction. OH, and books by Erik Larson, especially The Devil in the White City, are great.
  • Yay for non-fiction! (Not that I read much)

    Fiction puts me to sleep. True story. :?
  • "The Joel" said:
    Grumps, don't think you're better than us just because you are.

    Dune is totally rad.
    Yeah i try not to, but i cant help it...i mean i read DUNE and that makes me most awesome. I'm just jealous because i dont ever get to read anything anymore, or have fun conversations about reading crap. I just get to talk about law school and watch peoples eyes glaze over with boredom in about .2 seconds. I actually miss college, i got to read some sweet stuff, and for credit!
  • Currently reading: "Flight of the Dying Sun" by Rich Wulf, second part of the Heirs of Ash trilogy, set in the Eberron D&D campaign setting. (You know all those 5 million "Forgotten Realms" books all over the fantasy shelves in bookstores? Same thing, basically.)

    It's good stuff. I'm a big fan of the Eberron setting, but I rarely get the opportunity to run D&D games these days, and my friends don't know enough about Eberron to run an game in it for me, so this book fills in nicely for letting me enjoy the setting in lieu of anything else. I also want to pick up the "Inquisitives" series of Eberron novels, which from what I understand are basically about - much like Lucky was saying re: the Dresden Files - private detectives in a fantasy world. (Also, apparently Heirs of Ash and the Inquisitives books are the only really good Eberron novels out right now.)
  • I read stuff by dead people. I really enjoyed HG Well's Time Machine. I'm currently reading War and Peace, just because I can.

    I am adding Colbert's book to the list.
  • Colbert's book doesn't disappoint.
  • "Feddy" said:
    I am reading RCN LT. Leary Commanding. Before that It was Hyperion and also when I find the time The compelte Illustrated Guide to Joinery.
    I'm reading Hyperion right now, actually, and it's really awesome. It's totally the kind of sci-fi I'm into/wish more people would write.
  • Yeah the ideas are good enough where I just want them to stop and fleshout some of the ideas they hint at but never really define the history of. But the author jsut keeps goign on expecting you to figure them out for yourself, which is both good and bad.
  • Bah, my current reading trumps all you suckers.

    A Feast Unknown by Philip Jose Farmer. It's got Tarzan vs Doc Savage in a homoerotic, hyper-violent fight to the finish.

    BEAT THAT.

    edit:
    http://www.cafes.net/ditch/Feast1.jpg

    This isn't the version I'm reading, but it gets the point across nicely.
  • "The Joel" said:
    Colbert's book doesn't disappoint.
    I read the intro at a bookstore, I can sense that this book is different from all books before! Those few dollars didn't wanna be enough for me.
  • I've been reading the Zombie survival guide and the colbert book as well. Im also comptemplating reading the Holcroft covenant by Robert Ludlum again. Its a cheesy spy book but its a really good cheesy spy book
  • The Zombie Survival Guide is great. If you like it, you should pick up Max Brook's follow-up to it, World War Z.
  • Its been kind of a dry time for me as far as having anything to read but I did go ahead and pick up World War Z, and I was not too happy with it. I am familiar with the types of books and documentaries that author is poking fun at and I was never a fan of any of them, and as a result, after I got the joke and laughed I still had like 100 or more pages left to go. And after it stopped being funny it was boring maybe not by fault of the writer but more for my dislike of the format of which he chose, I don’t know. On the other hand however, after an exhaustive search I finally found a copy of Snow Crash, and am about half way though with it and I love it so far, but my feelings about it may have been skewed by the fact that I was eating a snickers (which makes every thing better) while reading it.
  • I started to read "The Witch of Portobello"and it is amazing <img class=" title="In Love" />
  • I just Finished re-reading Arthur C. Clarke Childhoods End, one of my favorite novels by him and i just started reading Isaac Asimov's Foundation series and so far it is awesome. and if you have never read it you should read Clarke's collection of short stories, if only for his story, Travel by Wire, A.K.A. what Star Trek Ripped of the transporters from
  • I recently read Lucifer's Hammer. It's pretty awesome.
  • With a name like Lucifer's Hammer it has to be good?
  • Reading everything by Malcolm Gladwell that I can find.
  • I'm reading The Mediterranean Caper, the first in Clive Cussler's "Dirk Pitt" series. It's standard action hero fare, blue eyed American archaeologist has to defeat the evil foreign menace and win the girl, but taking place in modern times. It is unapologetically sexist, though. When he meets the main love interest, he asks why she's sad, and she says it's because her husband died. He asks how long ago, and she replies "9 years," so he smacks her, says that's retarded, and she should have sex with him instead of being sad. This makes sense to her, so they do, right there on the beach. Don't get me wrong, it's not gekiga, it's just hilariously chauvinist.

    It's entertaining reading, being cut from the same cloth as the radio serials that Indiana Jones and The Mummy take cues from, but I feel a little dirty knowing that Cussler is no doubt living out a male power fantasy through his character.

    I'm also reading The Maltese Falcon, since I'm trying to get into the subgennre of hardboiled fiction. I like detective stories, too, but I'm out of Holmes, Poirot, and Ellery Queen is hard to find.
  • Currently reading Chuck Klosterman's Killing Yourself to Live: 85% of a True Story; the book is, ostensinly, about this dude going on a roadtrip around America, visiting places of famous music deaths (the field Buddy Holly and co crashed in, the hotel Sid Vicious killed Nancy Spungen), but it's really more of an autobiogrpahical-type-deal.

    It's very good, and very funny (in a music-geek kind of way).
  • I'm going through another Murakami book, Kafka on the Shore. I've also got the first of the Dexter series laying around. If a friend will bring me his Man in the High Castle, that will be mine as well. In the comics world, I'm trying to wrap up Sandman, which I've been trying to do for years now, only four books left to go! I'm also trying to decide if it's worth it to stick with 100 Bullets, and I'm thinking not.
  • "Spankminister" said:
    I like detective stories, too, but I'm out of Holmes, Poirot, and Ellery Queen is hard to find.
    Have you read Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency or The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul? Obviously they're more humor than detective but they are both good reads by Douglas Adams.

    I also recently reread You Can't Fight Tanks with Bayonets which is a really good book about the US propaganda war with Japan during WWII.
  • I'm going through another Murakami book, Kafka on the Shore.
    Did you read The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle? I found that book bewildering.

    Just finished A Canticle for Lebowitz, In the Land of Last Things and Things Fall Apart. The middle one wasn't so hot.
  • I recently finished reading Clarke's novelization of 2001.

    It was kinda dull. The physics were excellent, but there were only three genuinely engaging sections in the entire book.
  • "Gokiburi_Chachacha" said:
    I recently finished reading Clarke's novelization of 2001.

    It was kinda dull. The physics were excellent, but there were only three genuinely engaging sections in the entire book.
    At least now the end of the movie has a bit of context, right?
  • Some of my favorites are: the Ender series and Pastwatch by Orson Scott Card, A Deepness In The Sky by Vernor Vinge, 1984 by George Orwell, Brave New World by Aldous Huxley, Atlus Shrugged by Ayn Rand and basically anything by Tolkien and Asimov.
  • At least now the end of the movie has a bit of context, right?
    The movie always made perfect sense to me. I think it actually doesn't work as well when you take all the mystery out of it by explaining exactly what is going on. Trying to puzzle out what it means (which is really not that hard, all the clues are right there in front of you in the visuals of the film) makes the experience of the 2001 movie that much more rewarding.
  • Technically 2001 is not a novelization of the movie, the novel and the screenplay where made at the same time but the screenplay was based on what Clarke was writing.
  • "The Joel" said:
    Did you read The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle? I found that book bewildering.
    Most of it. I was about 3/4ths through and I lost my copy. I've been meaning to buy a new one for a while now. I've finished Hard Boiled Wonderland, Wild Sheep Chase, and The Elephant vanishes. I feel like I've missed one, but I'm not sure.
  • Most of it. I was about 3/4ths through and I lost my copy.
    I almost stopped reading at that point. I found the book to be somewhat inacccesible. I read it in a stilted fashion though so maybe I should take another run at it. It could be that my total lack of knowledge of Japanese culture was a hinderance.
  • Wind-Up Bird Chronicle is pretty dense, though I don't think I found it any less accessible then any of his other books. Anybody else read South of the Border, West of the Sun? It' one of my favorites of his, though I don't see it mentioned much.

    I'm almost finished reading Kavilier and Clay currently.
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